Oxford High School, Oxford

This was certainly the case with the design and development of the Oxford High School for Girls’ Day School Trust’s (GDST) new sixth form and arts centre, which features innovative cladding from Proteus Facades.

Designed by Ellis Williams Architects and developed by Beard Construction, the brief for the new Ada Benson Building, named after the school’s first headmistress, an advocate for women’s education, was to create a space that encompasses quality architecture, reflects the legacy of its namesake and promotes educational excellence.

The facility, which has been described as an epitome of school design, features contemporary classrooms, a health and wellbeing centre, textiles atelier, art studios and a state-of-the-art auditorium.

Providing the exterior of the building with a lustre that matches the quality within, perforated cladding panels, manufactured by Proteus Facades from a 2mm Stainless Steel Proteus SC tray in a 240S silver brush polish finish, wrap around the entirety of the first floor.

Each panel features striking perforations in a bespoke, organic and geometric pattern that adds architectural interest to the façade; whilst ensuring it is in keeping with other buildings on the school campus and respectful of the adjacent Conservation Area and mature trees along the existing southern boundary.

The Proteus SC panels, installed by Deane Roofing & Cladding, are supported off a 125mm x 50mm mullion and helping hand brackets set off the primary structure to generate a small soffit lip around the entire building that wraps further to form soffits in the main entrance areas.

Proteus SC is an engineered panel system that is offered in either solid, perforated or mesh panel formats. By utilising an extensive range of metals, colours, textures and forms it can add another dimension to any façade cladding project. The system can be manufactured in materials from 1mm to 5mm in thickness. Acoustic insulation layers can be encapsulated within the panel for internal applications and Proteus Facades can also provide contrasting fabric inserts when the panels are perforated.

During a tour of the school prior to the official opening, staff were particularly impressed with the geometric shapes within the design, which are also reflected in the atrium through carefully planned décor and light that wells from the first floor. In fact, the headmaster himself commented on the eye-catching way the interior reacts with the external spaces, through the use of carefully placed windows and the clever design of the bespoke Proteus SC panels.

In addition to the modern teaching spaces, the new Ada Benson building also features a ground-floor atrium and café alongside a social hub and community space for hire. The external surroundings include a contemporary garden and new secure bike stalls, which are also clad in the perforated Proteus SC panels helping to carry the aesthetics of the façade further across the school grounds.  

For further information about Proteus SC or to view more inspirational rainscreen facades from Proteus Facades, visit: www.proteusfacades.com or call: 0151 545 5075.

Lambeth Road, London

Pound Field student accommodation developed by Downing Construction, is situated on Lambeth Road in the heart of the historic Lambeth Palace Conservation Area (Zone 1) of central London.

Designed by KKA Architecture, the building features a mix of Proteus GL rainscreen cladding panels in Iron grey (RAL 7011) and Anthracite grey (RAL 7016), alongside Proteus CX porcelain ceramic rainscreen cladding panels in a Road, slate style finish.

The combination of glass and ceramic in the varying shades of grey and reflectivity, which have been described as sleek and aesthetically pleasing by local residents and passers-by, were chosen to complement the historic surroundings of the local area. At the same time, it provides a subtle contrast against the golden brickwork exterior on the building’s lower levels.

Proteus GL and Proteus CX are integrated modular rainscreen cladding systems with an aluminium honeycomb core and a lightweight metal rear skin. Proteus GL is structurally bonded between a toughened back painted glass face, whereas, Proteus CX has an ultrathin 3mm porcelain ceramic facing.

The glass panels were specified due to the materials inert properties and because it provides a virtually unlimited lifespan and is completely impervious to rust and corrosion. It is also lightweight, being up to 40 percent lighter than a typical glass structural screen, colourfast and resists UV rays.

With the advanced production technique of honeycomb bonding, Proteus CX was also chosen as it creates greater flexibility for architects to apply large format and lightweight ceramic finishes, as was the case on this development.

The use of porcelain ceramic is also more environmentally friendly, with the manufacturing process emitting 20 times less gas and dust emissions and 1000 times less CO2 emissions compared to a traditional ceramic production process.

Installed by Clarke Facades, each Proteus GL and Proteus CX panel is supported by Proteus Facades’ unique system of aluminium carriers and ancillary components, which can be installed on to any type of wall construction, with no visible fixings, creating a sheer, smooth finish. Both systems are also fully tested and compliant with CWCT Standards.

Adding further elements to the façade, Proteus also worked closely with Downing Construction, KKA Architecture and Clarke Façades to fabricate a new and bespoke range of complementary glass and ceramic Proteus SP spandrel panels.

Each spandrel panel, which features a Rockfibre core and pre coated steel rear skin, is fixed into glazed sections, improving the building’s energy efficiency by reducing the level of heat lost through the windows. The spandrel panels establish an integrated appearance around the windows and give an indication of the high specification of build and attention to detail inside the building.

Backing onto Archbishop’s Park and located close to London’s leading higher education institutions, Pound Field, is the latest in Downing’s portfolio of student accommodation properties.

The building provides 133 high-quality, sustainable, self-contained studio apartments. It also features commercial office space for local businesses, as well a residential courtyard, garden and outdoor terrace looking onto views of Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament.

Institute of Physics, London

The IOP was looking to relocate from Portland Place and open a new public institute to house the organisation’s membership activities, support its ambition to engage different communities, and make physics more accessible to a wider audience.

Based in ‘The Knowledge Quarter’, part of a 19th century Keystone conservation area in Kings Cross, the new headquarters provides education and exhibition facilities alongside a combination of office and public space with a basement auditorium and exhibition gallery, which are both open to the public.

Located at the junction of Caledonian Road and Balfe Street, the new IOP building replaces vacant shops that were in desperate need of regeneration. Architects TateHindle recognised this as the ideal space for the new headquarters and created a design that is both state-of-the-art, but respectful to the historical character of the neighbourhood.

As conservation was key in this project two main external brick facades on the original structure were retained, with an entrance bay inserted to create a visual slot through to the completely refurbished interior. In addition, the 5-storey development features floor-to-ceiling windows along Caledonian Road which also acts as a ‘shopfront’ and provides views of the exposed concrete walls within.

TateHindle added a one-and-a-half-storey extension to the original structure, which houses corporate meeting space for hire. Clad in solid Proteus HR 1.0mm VM Zinc panels with a Pigmento Blue finish, the façade remains in keeping with the uniformity of shopfronts on Caledonian Road; whilst perfectly complementing the brick and glass exterior on the lower levels and concrete interior.

Installed by Longworth Building Services Ltd, Proteus HR was specified because it is a lightweight, strong and versatile system that creates an optically flat aesthetic. The integrated modular rainscreen panels feature an aluminium honeycomb core, structurally bonded between two thin gauges of lightweight metal skin to create an optically flat panel.

Each panel is supported by the Proteus aluminium carrier system and ancillary components anchored to a cantilever steel frame from the underlying masonry structure. These allowed the panels to be hooked-on from behind, accentuating the sheer, smooth façade interrupted only by strips of lighter cladding built into the design to compartmentalise the flat elevations.

A distinctive and punctuating feature of this upper storey façade is a series of state-of-the-art ventilation stacks, also clad in a combination of solid and perforated single skin Pigmento Blue Proteus HR Zinc panels, with built in aluminium stiffening frames.

The stacks, which replace the original chimneys, are designed to draw in cold air at roof level and deliver it through floor-level grilles, using physics to reduce the carbon footprint of the building. A vertical column marking the main entrance to the building and a third floor façade facing onto Caledonian Road also features Proteus HR VM Zinc.

Taking the architect’s design from the outside in, Proteus SC perforated panels in 2mm aluminium with a RAL 7031 finish feature internally, with 20mm diameter holes carefully placed in an offset triangular pattern, to match those featured on the ventilation stacks.

Proteus SC is an engineered panel system that is offered in either solid, perforated or mesh panel formats. By utilising an extensive range of metals, colours, textures and forms it can add another dimension to any façade cladding project. The system can be manufactured in a variety of metals and from 1mm to 6mm in thickness. For internal applications, like the IOP, Proteus Facades provides contrasting fabric inserts and an acoustic insulation layer can be encapsulated within the perforated panels.

With a striking design that flows throughout the building, TateHindle, alongside main contractor Murphy Group, Longworth Building Services Ltd and Proteus Facades have together created an outward-looking and contemporary building; perfectly answering the client’s brief for a space that makes physics accessible and embodies how it is woven into our everyday lives.

The Institute of Physics is the professional body and learned society for physics in the UK and Ireland. It inspires people to develop their knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of physics.

The organisation works with a range of partners to support and develop the teaching of physics in schools. IOP aims to encourage innovation, growth and productivity in the business including addressing significant skills shortages and providing evidence-based advice and support to governments across the UK and in Ireland.

Vue Cinema, Eltham

Based in Eltham, the new Vue Cinema development is designed by architect Chapman Taylor in collaboration with contractor Wilmott Dixon. The building forms a major part of Greenwich Council’s ambitious plans to transform the high street into an entertainment destination for the community, with the aim of increasing footfall and business opportunities in the area.

Proteus Facades fabricated flat and pre-curved Proteus SC perforated panels, with a bespoke pattern designed by Chapman Taylor in a light grey (RAL 9006) finish, for the upper levels. The single skin panels were manufactured from a sheet of 4mm aluminium with a polyester powder coat (PPC) finish, which offers the ideal combination of high strength and a good resistance to chemicals, chipping, scratching and other service wear as well as corrosion and UV weathering.

The bright façade complements illuminated and glazed elements of the building whilst masking the box like structure of the upper storey. The smooth corners on the first floor, achieved through innovative use of the curved cladding, offers a subtle nod to the Art-Deco cinemas of the 1930s; paying tribute to a time-honoured design with modern materials and methods of construction.

Each panel, installed by Express Group Ltd., is supported by the Proteus aluminium carrier system and ancillary components anchored to a cantilever steel frame from the underlying masonry structure. These allowed the panels to be hooked-on from behind, accentuating the sheer, smooth façade interrupted only by the perforated design.

The six screen cinema, which accommodates 731 standard seats and 126 VIP seats, is complemented by two restaurants and a ‘Sky Bar’ which wraps around the building on the first floor and cantilevers the lower levels. The underneath of the terrace is clad in bespoke, twisted soffit panels manufactured by Proteus Facades, with a dark grey (RAL 7023) PPC finish.

Eltham Town Centre is part of the council’s focus on four sites within the borough which also includes Charlton Riverside, Greenwich Peninsula and Woolwich town centre; all identified as key places that can best promote their overall vision for growth and prosperity across the district.

During development, the cinema provided more than 100 apprenticeship weeks across the construction, supply chain and design, and 60 per cent of the total spend has been spent within 10 miles of the project.

Proteus SC is an engineered panel system that is offered in either solid, perforated or mesh panel formats. By utilising an extensive range of metals, colours, textures and forms it can add another dimension to any façade cladding project. The system can be manufactured in a variety of metals and from 1mm to 6mm in thickness. For internal applications Proteus Facades can provide contrasting fabric inserts and an acoustic insulation layer can be encapsulated within the perforated panels.

Hub by Premier Inn, West Brompton

Owned by Whitbread, the new 89-bedroom hotel based in West Brompton is a landmark opening for the company, which is currently working to expand its Hub portfolio, a new generation of compact, city centre hotels with contemporary room design.

Designers, Axiom Architects, specified EN13501 certified to A2-s1,d0 fire rated Proteus GL rainscreen cladding panels for the Hub by Premier Inn because of Whitbread’s uncompromising approach to safety in all aspects of the design. Whitbread’s policy is that all materials specified for its projects must achieve at least an A2, s1-d0 fire rating.

The façade panels were installed by Alu-fix (UK) Ltd and feature on the upper elements of the building and alongside glazed sections in an AGC Lacobel Cool White finish, which complements the crisp, contemporary design of the rooms within. The panels provide a contrasting finish against a light and dark grey brickwork exterior, which together creates a striking and aesthetically pleasing facade.

Proteus GL is an integrated modular rainscreen cladding system with an aluminium honeycomb core structurally bonded between a toughened back painted glass face and a lightweight metal rear skin. Each panel is supported by the unique Proteus system of aluminium carriers and ancillary components, which can be installed on to any type of wall construction, with no visible fixings, creating a sheer, smooth façade.

During the design process, Proteus Facades worked closely with Axiom Architects and main contractor Gilbert Ash Construction in a collaborative approach to identify the most suitable cladding system that met the client’s requirements.

With fire safety being an important factor, it was significant to the project team that Proteus GL, was certified to EN13501 A2, s1-d0. At the same time, aesthetics featured highly in the selection process, with AGC’s Lacobel glass again being the preferred choice due to the crisp white finish.

Large Proteus GL cladding panels were specified for the upper elements of the building to accentuate the clean, contemporary design, creating a façade that wraps around the top storey. At 3400mm x 1450mm these panels, along with the 1590mm x 2140mm window panels (the widest that can be specified), push the limits of architectural possibilities. Utilising the expertise of the inhouse technical and fabrication teams Proteus Facades devised an ingenious method of being able to fulfil this important design requirement.

Ongoing maintenance was an additional factor considered by the client’s facilities team, with the designers ultimately specifying Proteus GL because glass is a completely inert material that provides a virtually unlimited lifespan with minimal maintenance. Proteus GL facades are also lightweight, being up to 40 percent lighter than a typical glass structural screen, ideal for reducing weight loadings on the overall structure and creating a development with a lower carbon footprint.

Proteus GL is available in any RAL colour or can be digitally or screen printed to create a bespoke finish, offering architects a wealth of design options. It is colourfast, resists UV rays and fully tested and compliant with CWCT Standards. The glass is painted on the reverse, so wont flake or scratch.

Situated on Lillie Road, opposite the Earls Court development site, and with access to the District Underground Line and the London Overground Line, the Hub by Premier Inn West Brompton joins a number of new Hub developments in central London, providing an ideal place for a layover when staying in the city on business or for pleasure.

 

Photography by Michael Whitestone Photography

Holbrook House, Acton, London

Located in the Mayor of London’s Old Oak & Park Royal Opportunity Area, Holbrook House, designed by award-winning architects SimpsonHaugh and Partners, is part of the Downing Students portfolio of properties.

The £80 million development contributes to the Greater London Authority’s (GLA) ambitious plan to completely redevelop the area by creating thousands of new homes and jobs over the next 30 years. It is also the first student accommodation scheme in London that meets the new GLA Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) on affordable rents for student accommodation.

Constructed by Downing Construction and subcontractor Dane Architectural, Holbrook House is divided into three sections. The taller and more monolithic of the three multi-storey buildings features A2 rated, Proteus GL rainscreen cladding panels in five different shades (RAL5003, RAL5004, RAL5007, RAL5023 and RAL240 70 15) which graduate from a dark blue/grey to light blue/white.

Arranged floor to floor in a thin vertical format, the ombre-style finish of the panels helps minimise the visual impact of the structure, enabling it to carefully blend in with and reflect the city skyline and its surroundings, whilst acting as a standalone marker for the nearby junction of Victoria Road and Wales Farm Road.

The smaller of the three blocks at Holbrook House features natural terracotta tiles, with a cruciform pattern applied expressing the internal functionality, while the second, central section features bright reflective metal panels. All of which, along with the Proteus GL rainscreen cladding panels, were chosen to complement one another whilst providing a robust façade that offers some protection against the elements.

Proteus GL is an integrated modular rainscreen cladding system with an aluminium honeycomb core structurally bonded between a toughened back painted glass face and a lightweight metal rear skin. Each panel is supported by the unique Proteus system of aluminium carriers and ancillary components, which can be installed on to any type of wall construction, with no visible fixings, creating a sheer, smooth façade.

As glass is a completely inert material, Proteus GL provides a virtually unlimited lifespan because it is rust and corrosion free. It is also lightweight, being up to 33 percent lighter than the closest glass rainscreen system.

In addition, as the system is available in any RAL colour or can be digitally or screen printed to create a bespoke finish, Proteus GL offers architects a wealth of design options, is colourfast, resists UV rays and fully tested and compliant with CWCT Standards.

Holbrook House features 497 contemporary, affordable student residencies ranging from three bedroom, two bathroom shared flats to self-contained studio apartments. The building also includes a range of community facilities including a gym, common room, and games area. Landscaped roof terraces provide students with an outside space to relax, whilst retail space is provided at ground level adjacent to the London underground station entrance.

The new development is the second Downing Students building in North Acton, alongside ‘The Lyra’ on Portal Way, which offers 209 studio apartments for students studying at local institutions.

St Catherine’s College, Ainsworth Centre, Oxford

The new Ainsworth Graduate Centre is a striking circular design yet one that sits harmoniously in a location steeped in history. The building resides on the site of the original Grade I listed campus designed by renowned architect Arne Jacobsen.

Built between 1960 and 1964, Jacobsen designed the college’s main campus in its entirety. Since Jacobsen’s death in 1971 additional buildings have been delivered by the Danish architect’s assistant, Knud Holscher, and Stirling Prize-winning RIBA past president Stephen Hodder. Architects Purcell designed the new Graduate Centre as a continuation of the second phase of Hodder’s development by following his typology as sensitively as possible.

Proteus HR TECU bronze cladding panels were specified for the cylindrical three-storey hub, which features a seminar room and common room, as a reference to Jacobsen’s use of the material on previous projects at the college, synchronising old with new.

Proteus HR is a modular rainscreen system that offers a smooth façade with recessed joints. The panels have a lightweight aluminium honeycomb core structurally bonded between two thin gauges of metal. The lightweight nature of this rainscreen system minimises weight loadings on the underlying structure whilst achieving strength and rigidity.

The panels are fixed onto a unique system of aluminium carriers and ancillary components, which were designed and manufactured by Proteus Facades. Proteus fabricated the structural element of the fixing system so that it physically curves around the building. Installers Norman & Underwood then secured the flat panels to create a faceted façade that, when viewed from afar gives the perception that it is curved around a tight radius.

Proteus Facades also fabricated three varieties of TECU bronze fins for external use on glazed sections. Shorter fins were secured with a modified vertical aluminium extrusion cloaked with TECU bronze and secured with stainless steel brackets. Each one is fixed off the curtain wall system, with the TECU bronze capping designed bespoke to achieve the maximum depth from the glazing line to create a more striking aesthetic.

Deeper, vertical TECU Bronze fins are secured to a bespoke structural frame up to 450mm off the cladding line, which compartmentalises the façade. The vertical fins frame the structural bay and are fixed off curtain walling, spigoted into the ground and bracketed at the head. The internal aluminium carcass was secured with structural brackets back to the curtain wall and plated at join positions with discrete fixings.

Horizontal beams on the top of the upper level were fabricated in a curve and fixed to a bespoke aluminium structure, then cloaked with the TECU Bronze material from Proteus. Norman & Underwood secured the beams with structural gusseted brackets fixed back to the primary structure. All three types of fins went through a double-marquette process, where principal and secondary designs were presented to the architects and client for review before manufacture.

As well as a reference to the original campus buildings, the bronze finish of the panels and fins was specified to contrast in tone and glossiness with stainless steel panels, also manufactured by Proteus Facades, which feature on existing and the newly developed student accommodation blocks adjacent to the centre.

In the early 1990s and 2000s Hodder added three accommodation blocks to the site, housing a total of 54 rooms. The facades on these buildings feature Proteus HR Stainless Steel cladding panels, manufactured by Proteus Façades several decades ago. This material was originally chosen as the smooth finish of the stainless steel stands out against the coarse finish of the concrete structure creating a textured facade.

Like the Graduate Centre, the newest student accommodation pavilions are a continuation of Hodder’s development, adding 78 large spacious en-suite rooms connected by glazed stairwells. The façades of the new buildings imitates those constructed by Hodder, and so Proteus Facades was appointed to fabricate exact replicas of the original Stainless Steel panels they manufactured some twenty years previous for the new development, whilst using more modern methods of construction.

The stainless steel panels sit inboard of the building’s concrete frame with a standard pattern of two panels adjacent to large rectangular windows on each of the rooms. The Proteus HR rainscreen panels were supplied pre-finished with a 240S brushed polished finish.

The aluminium carrier system used is fully adjustable on all axis, allowing exacting sightlines to be maintained across the façade. This enables the façade at St Catherine’s college to make the most of linear shadow lines between the Proteus HR panels and concrete structure.

Record Hall, Hatton Square, London

Following an £18.4m refurbishment designed by Karakusevic Carson Architects, Record Hall has been transformed from an outdated former record depository, into a state-of-the-art, six-floor business centre with a striking exterior.

The brief given to Karakusevic Carson Architects by owners Workspace was to redevelop the 1920s structure on Leather Lane, part of the Hatton Garden Conservation Area, into a modern building that offers cost effective workshops suitable for companies working in both the jewellery and media & creative industries.

Redeveloped by main contractor HG Construction, Record Hall now offers 61,000 sq. ft. of office and studio space. The project involved refurbishing the existing four-storey building and adding a two-storey roof extension.

The upper levels of the building, including the new extension, are clad in striking Proteus HR Aluminium panels with a bespoke bronze United Anodisers (540) finish; chosen to reflect the heritage of the area, which has been at the centre of London’s jewellery trade since medieval times.

Installed by FPP Facades, Proteus HR was also specified because it is a lightweight, strong and versatile cladding panel that creates an optically flat aesthetic. The integrated modular rainscreen panels feature an aluminium honeycomb core, structurally bonded between two thin gauges of lightweight metal skin to create an optically flat panel.

In addition, Proteus Facades fabricated bespoke extruded vertical and horizontal fins with an identical finish, which gives the impression that the cladding panels are recessed into the building. This further compartmentalises the façade against the existing brickwork and complements the art deco window styles that, when illuminated in the evenings, shimmer in the light and provides further countenance to the striking design for passers-by.

Inclusion of the rainscreen cladding not only offers appealing aesthetics but adds to the energy efficiency by allowing the incorporation of high levels of insulation behind the panel – the relatively thinner panels allow increased insulation thickness on the inner structure whilst still maintaining the ventilated cavity behind the panels.

The Proteus HR panels provide the building with protection from the elements, too, including elevated windspeeds in this built up area with narrow streets dominated by medium rise structures.

Along with efficient new building services, the incorporation of high-performance insulation to both new and existing elements of fabric and a wildflower green roof have all contributed to the achievement of a BREEAM Excellent rating.

The aim of the redevelopment at Record Hall is to support new and growing businesses to thrive. Boasting 86 units ranging from 170 to 7,000 sq. ft., the building encompasses a Club Workspace outpost, the company’s coworking brand, along with ground floor café ‘The Archive’, high-tech meeting rooms, a co-working lounge and roof terraces offering views across the City.

Formed of two distinct parts, the building is situated in a tight site on a narrow street, which resulted in the street-facing elevation resembling more of a back entrance. As such, the architects also extended outwards to the boundary line to reorganise the interior and bring the main entrance to the centre of the plan to give it a direct visual relationship with a new lightwell.

Karakusevic Carson Architects commented: “The Record Hall project demonstrates how intelligent design can bring clarity and character to what was a previously complex and incoherent site and create a place where old and new cannot simply co-exist but flourish.”

 

Photography courtesy – Quintin Lake

York House, Kings Cross, London

Once described as unwelcoming and foreboding, York House in Kings Cross, which dates back to 1981, featured a complex brick façade, with a set back entrance and very small windows giving the building a stand-offish appearance as well as a poorly lit interior.

Following a £13 million refurbishment, the building, purchased by The Office Group, which provides flexible workspaces in London, Leeds and Bristol, has been transformed into a bright, co-working space, suitable for London’s thriving and growing businesses.

Designed by Architects dMFK, the 70,000sq. ft, eight storey redevelopment features both modern and traditional elements. An original Torigenus cast aluminium sculpture sits on the east side of the building, created by sculptor Geoffrey Clarke, whilst bold new additions include a double height entrance with offices above, as well as a set back roof extension and terrace on the 7th floor.

Proteus SC Perforated Aluminium cladding panels wrap around a parapet along the new terrace in a bespoke repeated zig zag profile, which blends softly with the sky and complements a brick lattice façade, set on a 45-degree angle. The perforated panels also span various windows on the upper elements of the building.

The Proteus SC cladding system at York House, manufactured from 2mm aluminium sheets, was specified with an Interpon D2525 Anodic Bronze Polyester Powder Coat (PPC) finish to all sides and 40mm perforations in a regular triangular grid.

Each panel, installed by Richardson Roofing, is supported by a recessed aluminium PPC framing system devised by Proteus Facades and coloured to match. The unique fixings discreetly hold the cladding system in place whilst allowing for a thinner perforated skin to be used without resulting in deflection or distortion, helping the façade remain both aesthetically pleasing and within budget requirements.

Furthermore, careful placement of the perforations allows for natural light to pass through new enlarged windows, comfortably illuminating the interior of the once darkened building, with no need for blinds and reducing the level of artificial lighting required. This, alongside the installation of solar panels, premium insulation and double glazing (taking the efficiency rating from G to A), have resulted in the redevelopment achieving a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ certification.

Proteus SC is an engineered panel system that is offered in either solid, perforated or mesh panel formats. By utilising an extensive range of metals, colours, textures and forms it can add another dimension to any façade cladding project. The system can be manufactured between 1mm and 5mm in thickness and an acoustic insulation layer encapsulated within the panel. For internal applications Proteus Facades can provide contrasting fabric inserts when the panels are perforated.

As The Office Group’s 38th workspace to open in the UK, and fourth in Kings Cross, York House has been completely regenerated into a luxurious sought-after building featuring state-of-the-art amenities including a café, gym, library and roof gardens with panoramic views of the city.

Alongside dMFK and Proteus Facades, other businesses involved in the redevelopment scheme, which officially opened at the end of 2019, include QS Quantem, structural engineer Webb Yates and contractor Collins Construction.

28 – 30 Hoxton Street, London (Project Drum)

Aviva, a British multinational insurance company and pensions provider, identified Hoxton Square as the ideal location to create a campus of offices and relocate its Digital Garage; a dedicated space where technical specialists, creative designers and business leaders collaborate to develop new ideas and services. As part of the development, known as Project Drum, Aviva purchased 28-30 Hoxton Square along with other buildings in the area.

28-30 Hoxton Square required a substantial level of refurbishment, which created the opportunity to extend the property to increase capacity and improve accessibility and the layout between two front facing blocks. Architects TTSP redesigned the three-storey structure, with an entirely new floor added to the front and rear elevations as well as the demolition of a single storey centre, which was rebuilt to four storeys.

A major part of the brief given to TTSP was to ensure that historic structural elements of the building were retained and left exposed whilst all new visible external elements were over-clad to harmonise with the original features. Working closely with TTSP, Proteus Facades provided support with the design of the rainscreen cladding system to ensure this challenge was met.

Proteus HR TECU Patina Madrid panels, installed by Openwood Facades Ltd, were chosen for the double height storey which sits atop of the central part of the building, with architectural fins to the south elevations and window frames designed to match. The patterned copper finish of the Proteus material perfectly complements the colours and textures of the surrounding buildings, whilst staying in keeping with the heritage of the original site that dates to the 1700s.

Proteus HR VM Zinc Quartz rainscreen cladding was also specified for the roof level of 28- 30 Hoxton Square, which provides a long, maintenance-free life and offers adaptability to various design styles ranging from traditional to modern.

Proteus HR was specified for both the TECU Patina Madrid and VM Zinc Quartz materials at Hoxton because it is a lightweight, strong and versatile cladding panel that creates an optically flat aesthetic that is highly suited for building facades. The integrated modular rainscreen system features an aluminium honeycomb core, structurally bonded between two thin gauges of lightweight metal skin to create an optically flat panel that is available in aluminium, steel, zinc, stainless steel, copper alloys and other materials.

To mirror the design of the external façade, Proteus HR TECU Patina Madrid panels were also specified for use on a double-width lift lobby, which acts as a bright and bold mid-section connecting various internal departments, including a state-of-the-art AV centre.

In addition, Proteus Facades supplied mesh screens fixed to windows along the rear elevation in a Polyester Powder Coated (PPC) finish, which remains a popular choice with architects because of its long-term performance and cost benefits.

All factors which resulted in the development being named as a finalist for the Mixology19 Awards in the Medium Commercial Interiors of the Year category.

Proteus Facades offers one of the widest ranges of TECU copper and copper alloys in the UK. This includes TECU Brass, TECU Copper, TECU Bronze, TECU Patina Madrid, TECU Gold, TECU Zinn, a tin-plated copper that weathers from silver to subtle grey tones, along with many others.

All the materials are available pre-patinated, which bypasses the gradual weathering process, so that the cladding panels take on the beautiful earth tones from the day the façade is installed. Proteus Facades also offers a range of other surface treatments that avoid, delay or accelerate the weathering process.

Originally built in the 1700’s as an upmarket residential development, by the late 20th century Hoxton Square became the place to be for artists, musicians, photographers and other creatives in London, which attracted crowds from across the city. As digital technologies have prevailed however the area is now home to a number of leading digital and tech led businesses like Aviva.